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for nelson mandela. >> he passed on peacefully. >> near midnight in johannesb g johannesburg's president announced the death. world leaders joined forces. in america our first black president spoke of his shehero,e first black president. >> he no longer belongs to us, but by the ages. >> to his county he represented forgiveness. >> you have a limited type of to stay on earth. you must try to use that period for the purpose of transforming the country in what you desire it to be. a democratic nonracial, non-sexist country. that is a great task. >> hello, i'm antonio mora, welcome to a special edition of "consider this". the man known as madiba said courage was not the absence of deed. born to a royal tribal family naming him rolihlahla dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tuberculosis
edition of "nightline." nelson mandela. freedom fighter, leader, a symbol of racial equality. the man who changed his country and the world has died at age 95. tonight, we're live on the ground in south africa. from his long walk to freedom -- >> tonight we have only one guest, nelson mandela. >> -- "nightline" was there. >> to spend so many years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. >> how a young boxer fought his way through nearly 30 years in prison to become his country's first democratic elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> to his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone. from world leaders to celebrities. when he visited the u.s., areeth that franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "nightline." >> this special edition of "nightline," nelson mandela, a man who changed the [s[man] no one told her,right?a. [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> this is a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining
for the one hour special edition of nightly news on nelson mandela. it is 3:30 friday morning in front of the home of nelson mandela. n of freedom who changed the world. >> in the name of the heavenly father of our people -- >> tonight the world reacts to the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95. >> he's now at peace. >> on our broadcast tonight, remembering the man and his legacy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> the death of nelson mandela from nbc news headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. to those who loved him, he was the hope and the light of the world. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. while this news, this announcement was inevitable, it has still come as a shock to the world with the realization that a beacon of freedom and moral authority and dignity and forgiveness is now gone. a former prisoner turned nobel laureate. late today local time in south africa after visible worry and activity outside the home, south african president zuma went on live it's and broke the sad news to his country. >> our belove
of nelson mandela. >>> nelson mandela, dead at the age of 95. >> doreen gentzler is covering this story for us. doreen? >> jim and pat, we are learning this news in the last 15 minutes or so. this story is still developing, the reaction to it and everything. of course, there is quite a few people in washington, long time friends and supporters of nelson mandela's. as we told you, the current south african president announced mandela died at the age of 95. we have a look at the life and legacy of the leader. >> reporter: nelson mandela was the face of reconciliation and a new beginning for south africa. brian is the human rights attorney in south africa part of the movement prior to his release from prison in 1991. reflected on the role he played once he was released. it was a time celebrated around the world. inside south africa, it was a precarious time. >> immediate contribution was to reach out and speak about reconciliation. >> i cherish the idea of south africa where all south africans are equal. >> far right wing politicians are prodding them. mandela convinced the supp
are watching al jazeera's special coverage of the death of nelson mandela. people all over the world mourning the death of the man they called madiba. these are the feeds coming live from johannesburg, outside the home of the south african antiapartheid hero. this is where he decide last night surrounded by his family. crowds of we'll wishers have been gathering, dancing, swimming, praising his life. they are there to celebrate his achievements and mourn his passing. nelson mandela, south africa's first black president was 95, dying in the company of his family after a long battle against lung infections. let's listen to what some of these people had to say gathered outside his home. >> i'm very sad. i met him when i was young. i grew up with him. i was very sad. i'm not happy that he gets to rest in piece. what he did for the country. i was telling my friend now, that if i was him i wouldn't be friends with him. i wouldn't be together. . >> obviously i'm shocked and sadden. it's hurtful. i was born in 1994. he fought for everything. i wouldn't be able to be here around my family. i hope he r
mandela's passing. she said it was one of her greatest honors to be invited to his home and called him humble, graceful and heroic. she hosted mandela on her show 13 years ago. >> i had said that you are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the j
:00. are celebrating nelson mandela in the streets of south africa and across the globe. special coverage tonight including our conversation with former president clinton. >>> also this evening, the dangerous storm heading across a huge part of our country. tens of millions of americans in its path and another right behind it. >>> great expectations. after a surge in jobs, unemployment drops to its lowest level in five years. a work in progress, but can it be sustained? >>> and once in a lifetime. mandela's visit to this country. those who were there reflect on the power of that moment in time. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. in london last night they chose to wait until the end of the premiere of the film "long walk to freedom," the story of nelson mandela, before breaking the news to the audience that nelson mandela had died. it brought a stunned reaction from the crowd which included prince william and his wife kate. the evening had been hosted by two of nelson mandela's daughters. and while the entire world knew this day was coming and the life of this 95-year-old man has come to
, freedom fighter, hero for change and hope. the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> he no longer belongs to u he belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela said it, "it always seems impossible until it's done", for this towering revolutionary who spent decades in prison for believing in freedom and equality nothing is impossible. the world is a better place because of him. the former south african president died at his home. he was 95. outside crowds gathered all evening and in the morning and have been gathered four hours to mourn his passing, but to rejoice in a remarkable life. scenes are incredible, people dancing and singing. they are paying tribute to him. they are doing the same in new york. a famed venue in harlem, and the marr key honours nelson mandela. morgan radford is here in the studio. >> talk about the life of nelson mandela, and what he means to so many people. >> nelson mandela is a symbol of hope, freedom, a time in this world, and in our country and theirs when equality did not s did not reign free and is a symbol for young americans growing up understan
>>> this is "world news." tonight nelson mandela, his struggle and strength healed a nation and changed a world. >> i come here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> from a tiny prison cell, he rallied millions against racism and injustice. his long walk to freedom a beacon of hope for generations. >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> tonight, the world mourns the passing of an icon. >>> and a good evening to all of you. we welcome you to a special edition of "world news," beginning the breaking news, a titan has died, nelson mandela, the man who taught the modern world you can transform anger into hope. he was 95 and his death wasn't a surprise but his life continues to astonish us in living the possibility of a better world. he spent 27 years in prison for his belief in freedom, equality and emerged with a message of generosity toward his 0 pressers. we have reaction from around the world tonight. first robin roberts who has traveled to south africa several times takes a look back at his extraordinary life and inconquerable spirit. >> reporter:
. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for ever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people and to millions around the globe. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and good friday morning. people around the world are remembering nelson mandela. the global symbol of fore behrens, peace and dignity. >> here's a live picture from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life by dancing in the streets throughout the night. you see a large crowd gathering there right now. >> abc's alex marquardt is there in johannesburg, where they're still trying to come to grips with the death of an icon. >> reporter: a new day has dawned here in south africa. there's a profound sense of loss
. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life, by chancing through the streets overnight. >> alex ma
as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with o this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. "early today" starts right now. >>> good morning. i'm mara schiavocampo. he's being remembered as a man who changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tire rsless struggle for freedom and the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we
obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we have consider spot don'ts automobile across the united states and the world. we also have guests hire in the studio, right now my colleague is here, talk a little bit about the incredible significance o
finnegan with the continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule. >>> i'm barbara in london, remembering mandela in europe. the statesman who touched a generation. [ gunfire ] >>> in other news, france s more troops to the central african republic a day after violence left more than a hundred people dead. a cash for work scheme is winning praise for cleanup after typhoon haiyan. >>> we begin this news hour then with the dae of nelson mandela. the president of south africa addressed the country to reveal details of theno carrierringrin0 [ technical difficulties ] >> and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. in the coming days they will honor his legacy and memory as they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >> so the state funeral as you said next sunday december 15th. south africa won't have seen a state occasion like it. and with so many world leaders flying in, it is likely to be a logistical nightmare. >> yes, it is. but t
from around the world. stay ahead on cnn. . >>> remembering nelson mandela. the world mourning the loss of a legend morning. the south african president hailed for his courage, his conviction, his decency. i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. we welcome our viewers in the u.s. and arnold the world. >> this is a special edition of "early start" beginning this morning because the world is grieving and, in some ways, celebrating a giant among men. nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in arwa damon when is live in johannesburg in south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela a hero, a legend, an icon. so many of the people we are speaking to here will say that hardly truly encompasses what it was that he meant for this nation and what it was that he allowed this nation to become. behind me is th
-old american hs been released from korea. >>> a world without nelson mandela. >>> help wanted. a december surprise on the job front more companies are hiring but does that mean the country is turning around. >>> the luck of the draw. the world cup selection is set. the u.s. is facing some tough odds but don't count the team out. >>> and we begin with more news, breaking news out of north korea. american citizen merle newman has been frie freed after beingd bheldby north korea for a month. new dollarsman wags was te detaa sightseeing tour. melissa is live in san lan witht developmentses. developments. as you can imagine the family has been zpi distraught. the north korean's famously unpreictable. the u.s. state department had this statement. >> we are pleased that mr. newman has been allowed to depart from the dprk and rejoin his family zplmp. this positive decision shows the continuing detention of mr. bay who has been in dprk custody for over a year. the dprk the official name of north korea. vice president biden had comments about merle newman's release. >> it's a positive thing they ha
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
neighborhoods, schools, and train. in his autobiography mandela reflected on his experience growing up under apartheid. an african child born in an africa only hospital taken in africaon only bus, living in africaon only area, ride africaon only bus, train and be stopped any time day or not and asked to produce a pass. his life with regulations that cripple his growth, dim his potential and stunt his life. this was the reality. against that backdrop, mandela would become the man who neerm si -- nearly single handedly changed the fate changing to multi-p dimensional. he was suspended for participation in a protest, by the early 1950st and '60s mandela had grown political in the leader of congress fighting apartheid. in 1961 he gave his first tv interview. >> the africans prior want franchise on the basis of one man one vote. we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many. following numerous arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." newsis is "bbc world america." the death of nelson mandela brings a sense of loss around the world as people paid tribute outside his home in johannesburg. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
of the antiapartheid leader. this as scene outside the family home. early in the morning, now nelson mandela the first president of south africa has died surrounded by his wife and family. he was 95. from there around the world, people are paying tribute to the freedom fighter. i was with him in his home. >> which is where i met mr. mandela when i was with jesse jackson. >> what was that like. >> this is a man whose mind is so sharp. in that in his voice, hello. are you happy to see me today. i said i am sir, i am here to see you today. he was eating breakfast, and reading newspapers in four different languages. reading in zulu, reading in english, it was really remarkable. how sharp his mind was, if i can only be that sharp at that age. >> clearly, when i look at a picture like that of you, and this group that had come to see nelson mandela. >> his life was pretty great then. >> obviously, you weren't around when a lot of the bad things happen. >> you are showing my age, john. i think yo are showing my life. as i mentioned to you elier, this was very symbolic especially because he is from a tribe i g
today we learned of the death of nelson mandela, the man who lead south africa from apartheid to a multiracial democracy. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> pelley: from johannesburg. an american is gunned down in benghazi, libya. was it terrorism, bob orr is covering. snow, ice and bitter cold stretch across half the nation. manual bojorquez on what it is hitting and where it is going. and the special bond between two presidents. we'll talk to bill clinton about his friend nelson mandela. >> we could have had the politics of resentment. he chose the politics of inclusion. se the politics of captioning sponsored by cbs ptioning sponsored this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. with s >> pelley: good evening. he changed the world. you can't say that about many people. but you can say that about nelson mandela. the man who lead south africa's peaceful transition out of apartheid and became the country's first black president. he died today at the age of 95. mandela had been battling a lung infection for many months. right after its official annou
"troublemaker." to his clan, he was madib, a to his country he was tata. the world will remember nelson mandela as the father of his nation. whose revolve and leadership through decades of oppression, and 27 years in prison, forced south africa to end the cruelty of apartheid. and whose dignity inspired not only his own homeland, but those that work for freedom and civil rights across the world. we begin with the great man's own words. the ones we will all remember of him. >> difficulties he once wrote to his wife, wreak some men. but make others. real leaders, he said, must be ready to sacrifice all, for the freedom of their people. i can rest only for a moment before with freedom, come responsibility and i dare not linger for my long walk is not yet ended. his long walk ended today, as he died at the age of 95. this is the moment of deeper sorrow. yet what made him great is what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> looking back now to the headdy days in 1990, and the days after that, the excitement throughout the world even the months after that, leaf him here in the wr
the scalp. selsun blue itchy dry scalp. mandela being alive, now that he's gone, there's so much more progress to be made. where do they stand economically? >> there's still a lot of problems. there's de facto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wif
>>> i cherish the idea. so help me god. >> remembering nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid activist and south african former president dies at 95. this morning he's being remembered as an icon of human rights. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 6th, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered for his resolve and ability to forgive, traits that helped peacefully end the brutal segregationist policy in his native south africa. south africa's first black president died yesterday at the age of 95 following a long illness. he was surrounded by his family. mandela's fight against apartheid made him an inspiration to millions, including president obama. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> when mandela died, crowds gathered throughout south africa to mourn his death a
of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against aparthe apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided
of nelson mandela brings a sense of loss around the world as people paid tribute outside his home in johannesburg. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also in celebration of the life of the man they call madiba. >> people are ce
, including many women and irn ch. in the end, it killed 69 people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life
there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after
. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> we have never doubted in our mind, even during the darkest hours of our struggle, that eventually we would win. >> he calls himself an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances. >> sometimes it's calls for a nation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, his life, his legacy. >> as long as injustice exists in our world, none of us can truly rest. >> we talk to the people whose lives he touched. this is a special edition of "good morning america," remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >>> we do say good morning, everyone. and we are celebrating the life of one of the most remarkable men in history. he has been called the apostle of reconciliation. a leader who inspired so many, with his own fight for freedom and justice for all. we have so many pictures that we're going to share with you. this, outside of his home in south africa. crowds gathering all around the world. tributes pouring in from around the globe this morning. >> 95 years old. a monumental life.
of nelson mandela. former secretaries of state colin powell and james baker share their memories with us. plus, rock star bono on his friend's wisdom and courage. >>> relentless cold batters much of the country. the ice storm threatens to disrupt the lives of millions. >>> and one of the last survivors of what could be the most important treasure hunt history. >>> but today, your world in 90 seconds. >> for me, he had hope, he represented freedom. so, today, i'm here to show i'm thankful for him! the world mourns the passing of an icon. >> nelson mandela died at his home surrounded by his family. >> went from the prison cell to the presidency with such unmatched grace. >> i think we try to prepare ourselves, but emotionally, it's not that easy. >> crowds gathering outside the home in johannesburg. ♪ >> he was a father figure to the nation. the one thing we all had in common. >> justice for all, let freedom ring. god bless. >> millions of americans are facing another big blast of winter weather. >>> the november jobs report. 203,000 jobs added in november. the jobless rate fell to 7%. >
of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. >>> good morning. i'm ma ra schiavocampo. he's remembered as a man that changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom earned him the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we should have the sa
. thank you for watching our special situation room coverage of the passing of nelson mandela. much more coming up right now on erin burnett "outfront" with jake tapper filling in. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. you're watching erin burnett "outfront." we're following the news story of nelson mandela, the first black president of south africa. an anti-apartheid icon. he was 95 years old. his passing was announced late this afternoon by south african president jacob zuma. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. but though we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sense of the profound and enduring loss. >> president obama who met mandela in 2005 said he cannot fully imagine his own life without the example set by mandela. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to follow the example that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. to never disdown the difference that one person can make. to strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. for now
to the ages. >> what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek. >> good evening from washington. in its own way is in a state of mourning tonight. nelson mandela was historic figure, inspiration and role model for africans, south africans, but americans as well in our own troubles racial history and struggle to overcome that mirrored to americans in the life and the struggle and the suffering and then the triumph and the leadership of nelson mandela whose passing at 95 was noted by his successor, south african president, jacob zuma. >> yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. and in him, we saw so much of ourselves. >> reporter: one of those who says he was especially inspired is american president, barack obama, who shared his reaction a few moments ago to the passing of south africa's first black president. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, gave me a sense of what human beings can do when guided by hopes and not fears. like so
ten days. >> mandela will be laid to rest with a state funeral sunday, december 10th. leading up to the service, zuma declared this sunday, december 8th, a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium in johannesburg that hosted the world cup. he'll lie in state for three days at pretoria city hall. flags are at half staff in the capitol and white house as well, which confirmed this morning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will participate in memorial events. the guest list for his funeral will likely include every living u.s. president able to travel along with dignitaries from around the world and celebrities across the globe today, countless newspapers paying tribute. as president obama says now belongs to the ages. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> and this morning, on the "today" show, former secretary of state colin powell who attended mandela's inauguration, shared what he meant to him. >> a
nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all of huma
>>> this sunday, nelson mandela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa t
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
>> we 11ed just a few hours ago that nelson mandela had passed away. the at the time is still a shock, and it is a great shock. >> thank you for having us, and i want to send out condolences on behalf of the family. where condolences to the family, and also to the people of south africa. the biggest thoughts are trucage, humility, somebody's great vision, passion, for life. and they are not saying any minute to do good. i apologize for not calling it the right time, trance africa. what was it like to meet him? >> oh, everything that was more than -- and i knew it would be anxious, and excited and dealing with -- more tremendous then i have half. a meeting with him. and just anything that is said about him, even after the meeting you just multiply it even more. the man is a great leader, but with humility, somebody who was able to bring together many many different people together. >> also being able to articulate his prince. s. his passions. but at the sate time, being able to emphasize with others. and it takes this tremendous person to do that. so everything people are sayin
nelson mandela, the south african freedom fighter has been canonized for his accomplishments. did you realize the u.s. had him on a terrorist watch list until 2008? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." we begin with the national lead. it's like most of the country is living inside a flu medicine commercial right now. brutally cold weather has descended upon most of the nation, bringing a deadly ice storm sweeping from texas to new york. nearly 2,000 flights have been canceled, many of them going to or from the dallas-ft. worth airport. it's colder in dallas right now than it is in anchorage, alaska. authorities fear that no amount of shoveling or salting will make the streets safe enough for the dallas marathon or holiday parades so officials decided to cancel both of those events this weekend. at least four deaths are blamed on this massive storm. two of them in oklahoma, where the roads are like skating rinks, highway patrol officers there have responded to more than 100 weather related crashes just since yesterday morning. there are fears that this ice storm could be catastro
nelson mandela. >> here in the u.s. we're tracking a dangerous ice storm. forecasters saying it could be the worst ice storm ever for the region. people are waking up without power but millions could end up losing electricity for weeks, they fear, this as temperatures continue to plummet. >> we'll continue to what's going on but we want to react to the passing of nelson mandela. here's a live look at the crowds that have been gathered outside the late south african leader's home. they're singing, their dancing, nations, of course, showing their respect. flags around the world at the white house we'll show you, see it, half-staff. this morning, honoring the anti-apartheid leader's life and legacy. we'll follow the developments from every corner of the world. let's bring with robyn curnow. she's in johannesburg. >> the news came just before midnight south african time that nelson mandela had gone. so many south africans woke up to this stark, gut wrenching head line. this says "hamba kahle madiba." >> it was an announcement heard around the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the foun
. [ singing ] >> south africa begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prey and reflection. >> south korea expands its air defense zone raising tensions in asia >> and the heartland takes a hit from storms. today it's headed for the east coast [ ♪ music ] >> remembering nelson mandela. today was a day of national reflection. there was no bigger church or congregation than the people at the catholic church in south africa. [ singing ] >> the sounds of soweto, of a nation on what is not just another sunday. [ singing ] >> the congregation of the biggest catholic church in this largely christian country celebrates nelson mandela in song and prayer. similar services in all faiths are held across south africa in a day of reflection. >> we gather here to thank god for his life. we thank god for the blessing he bestowed on this world through the life of madiba. >> this church holds a special place in the history of antiapartheid movement. it was a sanctuary for protesters, sometimes violated by the police. >> so why do you think police threw tear gas insi
rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign of good for tutune, so maybe it is honor of mandela. up until this moment, people have been dancing in the streets, they've been singing songs, they've been recalling aspects of nelson ma
mandela, a special "meet the press" a special in-depth look at a world leader whose course and determination changed the course of world events. >> his journey from a prison to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us that there is true freedom and forgiveness. >> a look at mandela's life, his effect on u.s. politics and policy and how he handled controversy and criticism, all part of his enduring legacy. among my guests today, my colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a d
for this special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to re
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